Comic Reviews By Tony Couto
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Issues
  Comic Book Series Issues
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7.5
Action Comics (2011) 2
8.0
Action Comics (2011) #23.1

Without compromising his robotic, absolute personality, Cyborg Superman is injected with heart as he is linked heavily to Krypton and Supergirl. This origin story tells the tale of how Zor-El lost his humanity before his life-changing transformation. Action Comics #23.1 is an effective origin story, that despite its plot gaps and conflicting art decisions, packs a powerful message.

7.0
Action Comics (2011) #23.3

On the surface, Action Comics #23.3 is a fun read about an awful Lex Luthor. By offering one take on the character's moral compass, and sporting unmoving art, the issue falls short of giving the character a cerebral spotlight.

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9.5
Adventures Of Superman (2013) 1
9.5
Adventures Of Superman (2013) #1

Adventures of Superman #1 never feels redundant in its interpretations of the character. It proves that Superman can infinitely inspire, despite the assumption that the world needs more ‘dark and ‘grounded' characters for the modern age. Adventures of Superman #1 is a continuity-free feat that should be read by all. If you need a primer for Zack Snyder's Man of Steel, or need to convince your friends that Superman isn't ‘pointless', this series should be your first destination.

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9.1
Afterlife With Archie 1
9.1
Afterlife With Archie #1

Afterlife With Archie #1 doesn't feel like a gimmick, but a truly stellar horror tale from start to finish.

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9.3
Animal Man 2
9.7
Animal Man #22

With Animal Man #22 comes a truly layered, artful comic that deserves to be reread from multiple perspectives.

8.9
Animal Man #23

Animal Man #23 sweeps some of the conflict of last issue to the wayside, but creates its own set of intriguing problems, while offering a slew of entertaining and inventive moments in the Red.

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6.3
Avengers A.I. 1
6.3
Avengers A.I. #1

Avengers AI #1 spends too much time trying to establish its shaky premise, when the book, about such unique AI characters, could have benefitted from showcasing the cast's interesting powers.

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8.6
Batman (2011) 2
8.2
Batman (2011) #22

With such a rich lore to draw from, Snyder and Capullo have done a fantastic job picking old elements of the Batman mythos, while contributing to relationships like Alfred and Bruce's. Batman #22 has its awkward artistic moments, but overall, brings added depth to Batman's early career.

8.9
Batman (2011) #23

Batman #23 is an exceptional primer for anyone wanting to know how Batman's relationships are defined in comics. While it is derivative of what has come before, it does so on purpose, to reinstate the significance of each facet of the Batman mythos.

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7.8
Batman/Superman (2013) 3
8.3
Batman/Superman (2013) #1

While there are questionable scripting moments, in Batman/Superman #1, overall it is a solid debut issue that successfully captures the friendship between Clark and Bruce, through their well-written personalities and the evocative visuals.

6.7
Batman/Superman (2013) #2

There are interesting things happening to both Batman and Superman in Earth 2. However, by not properly guiding the reader through their conflict, and avoiding the relationship that's supposed to be the backbone of the comic, Batman/Superman #2 doesn't have the heart and complexity that makes up Bruce and Clark's friendship.

8.3
Batman/Superman (2013) #3

Batman/Superman #3 is a much better mix of Lee's unconventional art and Pak's very personal script, and together create a telling take on Batman and Superman's friendship.

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5.3
Danger Girl: The Chase 1
5.3
Danger Girl: The Chase #1

I'd like to recommend this book based solely on its popcorn factor, but there's nothing special about this outing when it comes to special agent teams. Danger Girl: The Chase #1 hits the quota for action, but misses on many other levels.

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8.9
Daredevil Vol. 3 4
8.8
Daredevil Vol. 3 #28

Daredevil #28 continues to bring pathos to the series without weighing it down. A lot of it is indebted to the stellar narration, and plenty of funny moments are had with the characters Waid makes us genuinely care about.

8.7
Daredevil Vol. 3 #29

Daredevil #29 encapsulates the current era of Daredevil – clever, charming and riveting, thanks to the light script and nuanced, moving art. Who needs an animated series, when you have a comic like this.

9.9
Daredevil Vol. 3 #30

Introducing the cosmic to the street-level grit, Daredevil #30 is a miraculous blend of genres, and at its heart, challenges Matt Murdock's struggle for happiness as he deals with the unknown.

8.0
Daredevil Vol. 3 #31

The use of Jester and Pym turned out to be great choices, but there wasn't enough reason why they couldn't be replaced by other characters in the issue. Still, Daredevil #31 is a moving story that portrays layered relationships, complex moral dilemmas and emotional resonance in its visuals.

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9.0
Daredevil: Dark Nights 2
9.6
Daredevil: Dark Nights #1

Daredevil: Dark Nights #1 doesn't even need a conclusion for it to be deemed a good story. On its own, this issue is both lyrically and visually immersive, in a way that evokes emotions effortlessly from the reader. Seriously, pick this up.

8.4
Daredevil: Dark Nights #2

Because so much of the conflict comes from Daredevil's internal thought, I can't help but feel like the character hasn't been tested enough in the series, even though the character tells us all the other crimes he cannot stop. Regardless, Daredevil: Dark Nights #2 continues the emotional and moving story that had been established in issue one.

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7.9
Dark Avengers 2
7.9
Dark Avengers #190

I look forward to where these characters end up next, now that Jeff Parker has given them a purpose, which is to search for a purpose. While more of this arc could have been dedicated to the main group, Dark Avengers #190 showcased what would be considered a strange team for mainstream comic books, and proved them justifiable amidst Marvel's vast line up.

7.9
Dark Avengers #190

I look forward to where these characters end up next now that Jeff Parker has given them a purpose, which is to search for a purpose. While more of this arc could have been dedicated to the main Dark Avengers, Dark Avengers #190 showcased what would be considered a strange team for mainstream comic books, and proved them justifiable amidst Marvel's vast line up.

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5.0
DC Universe Presents 1
5.0
DC Universe Presents #19

It's a shame that this issue wasn't a standalone tale or a callback to Deadman, who started the series off strong. I recommend this to only the most diehard of Beowulf fans. Otherwise, go read JMS and Saiz's The Brave And The Bold.

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7.5
Detective Comics (2011) 4
5.6
Detective Comics (2011) #21

I see potential in the Man-Bat back-up, but I felt cheated on this outing. It felt a lot like a recap on how Langstrom is coping emotionally with his condition. With no apparent defined role amongst the other Batbooks, Detective Comics fails to draw me to it, while there are plenty of other destinations for my monthly Bat fix.

8.7
Detective Comics (2011) #22

Detective Comics #22 takes cues from the successful film adaptations, and in doing so, allows the realistic grit of those interpretations shine through in this series.

8.1
Detective Comics (2011) #23

Detective Comics #23 feels true to the Batman that the general public has grown to love. While it doesn't introduce any redefining elements to the mythos, it offers an enjoyable and exciting installment in the character's career.

7.7
Detective Comics (2011) #23.3

Detective Comics #23.3 presents a clever spotlight on some intriguing villains in Mr. Freeze, Poison Ivy and Killer Croc. Scarecrow requires more of an arc himself in the issue, and less monologues on the character's part, and exclusion of Killer Croc, might have left room for an even more stellar starring tale.

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7.2
Fantastic Four (2012) 3
8.4
Fantastic Four (2012) #8

Fantastic Four #8 is that classic time travel, space trotting story that takes you back to a familiar time, where even though the setting that is explored is old, we discover new things about Ben Grimm.

8.6
Fantastic Four (2012) #9

Fantastic Four #9 clearly defines the characters of Reed Richards, Ben Grimm and Victor Von Doom, and I recommend it to new readers who want to learn the intricacies in their decision-making and dynamics, as well as longtime readers who want a new perspective on the guilt Ben Grimm faces for the decisions of his past.

4.6
Fantastic Four (2012) #12

Fantastic Four #12 certainly has an adventurous quality to it, but is a very sloppy and disappointing finish for Fraction's run on the title. A lot of it feels plain silly, and lacks the depth of issues in the previous arcs.

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9.1
FF (2012) 4
9.1
FF (2012) #9

FF #9 thematically matches previous issues in proving the commonalities between the diverse cast of characters. While there wasn't an emotional punch, like any of the Scott Lang dream segments from other installments, the issue made up for it with an abundantly fun premise.

9.4
FF (2012) #10

As the book describes itself within it's own pages, it's "FF-y" " weird, clever and unlike any other superhero team comic on the stands. FF #10 is no different, and if anything, amps up the oddity.

8.7
FF (2012) #11

With a spotlight on the core team in FF #11, Fraction and Allred successfully tackle the feeling of belonging to a family and the FF's connection to New York City.

9.2
FF (2012) #12

FF #12 delivers on the heart, charm and intrigue that it has provided thus far. FF is the most consistently enjoyable and gleeful pleasure on the stands each month.

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6.8
Flash (2011) 1
6.8
Flash (2011) #23.1

The Flash #23.1 is a daring story with the bleak position it leaves Keystone and Central City, but a lot of what happens could be inferred from the events of Forever Evil #1. Save for the final page, the events of the comic carry as you'd expect, and don't have enough of a resistance against Grodd's rule.

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7.8
Forever Evil 1
7.8
Forever Evil #1

An accessible and fun read, Forever Evil #1 is a solid start for the crossover. There is definite room for improvement in overall facial emotion and grounding for the Crime Syndicate, but as a debut issue, a strong premise has been established for what's to come.

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6.7
Forever Evil: Arkham War 1
6.7
Forever Evil: Arkham War #1

Forever Evil: Arkham War #1 is a prelude at best, as it essentially sets up the disposition of Gotham's villains, but doesn't build on their motives or the dramatic tension between them.

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8.9
Godzilla: Rulers Of Earth 2
9.0
Godzilla: Rulers Of Earth #1

Godzilla: Rulers of Earth #1 moves at Mechagodzilla-firebreath-fast pacing, and is an absolute treat for fans of Godzilla or over-the-top mayhem. A Roland Emmerich Production this is not, but an imaginative twist on the decades-old character.

8.8
Godzilla: Rulers Of Earth #3

This series doesn't bother with melodramatic tension, but still creates drama with the most unsuspecting of characters, like Godzilla itself.It's tough to make each character equally rounded, but the CKR Science Division could use a little more definition. Still,Godzilla: Rulers of Earth #3 is a grossly fun experience for camp lovers.

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7.1
Green Arrow (2011) 2
7.8
Green Arrow (2011) #22

Green Arrow #22 could stand to establish relationships more clearly, to help steer the book from becoming filled with stereotypes. Otherwise, it is a solid action-filled spectacular that manages to showcase the grit and skill of Green Arrow in new ways.

6.4
Green Arrow (2011) #23

While there are fun elements to Green Arrow #23 with the art – in particular Ollie's arrows and Count Vertigo's attack – the issue is bogged down with issues of plotting and radical art choices.

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8.2
Green Lantern (2011) 6
9.8
Green Lantern (2011) #20

And in his greatest accomplishment, Johns told the definitive Sinestro story " a man driven by loss, who has such a devotion to the Corps, that he is willing to oppose it, to keep it alive. Thanks Geoff, for 9 incredible years of storytelling.

8.6
Green Lantern (2011) #21

This issue is an exciting new chapter in the Green Lantern mythos. While Venditti is approaching the Corps and Hal from another direction, he respects all the groundwork that has been laid by Johns up to this point. From humour, to romance to cosmic adventure, Green Lantern #21 show signs of it being the start of a very fun run.

8.1
Green Lantern (2011) #22

It's obvious that this is still the quiet, building stage of Venditti's run, which makes complete sense since it's only his second issue. Because of this, there's not a ton going on, but what Venditti delivers on in terms of both action and his focus on how power affects individuals, offers a whole lot of depth and entertainment to be had in Green Lantern #22.

8.8
Green Lantern (2011) #23.2

Green Lantern #23.2 is a strong standalone tale that wholly encapsulates the galactic menace that is Mongul, with its spot-on dialogue and stunning art.

9.4
Green Lantern (2011) #23.3

Green Lantern #23.3 is a special moment in the life (or afterlife) of Black Hand, as Soule and Ponticelli craft a whole new tone and skill set for the character that elevate him to new levels.

4.6
Green Lantern (2011) #23.4

Green Lantern #23.4 fails to give Sinestro the layered justice and spotlight he deserves. Rather than focusing on a small moment of change in the character to ring true his conviction to fear, his history is jammed into this unsuccessful outing.

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8.4
Green Lantern Corps (2011) 2
8.2
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #21

This issue grounds firmly the emotional stance of longtime Corps members, and teases conflict to be had with the new recruits. While the tone of the book feels a little uneven at times, and its position among the Green Lantern lineup is still unclear, Green Lantern Corps #21 is a strong character-driven story that pushes the characters to find an identity in a new era.

8.6
Green Lantern Corps (2011) #22

Green Lantern Corps #22 has John's reactions to the events in other GL books, which may shaft some readers who don't read Green Lantern. While this takes away from the standalone quality of the book, there are plenty of character moments brought out by the engaging interactions with John.

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8.2
Indestructible Hulk 5
8.8
Indestructible Hulk #8

While Indestructible Hulk #8′s subplots felt underused/unnecessary, the driving central plot and themes hit extremely well. If this series isn't on your pull list, at the very list pick up the three issue arc that Simonson has exceptionally contributed.

8.9
Indestructible Hulk #9

Whether it be Thor or Daredevil, other heroes bring out the best in Bruce Banner. With Indestructible Hulk #9′s inclusion of Daredevil, Waid continues to prove that there is much to love about the volatile, arrogant being that is the Hulk. With every moment of laughter, Waid manages to add a layer of character growth to the Hulk, and the other characters he teams up with.

7.3
Indestructible Hulk #10

With Indestructible Hulk #8, Waid and Scalera deliver your more run of the mill team-up story, instead of the introspective tale that was crafted with the previous Thor team-up.

9.2
Indestructible Hulk #11

Complex, but delivered in an incredibly engaging manner, Indestructible Hulk #11 is the template for a “part one” done right. While a great issue in its own right, it makes me wish I could find a rift in time to get to the next installment right away.

6.7
Indestructible Hulk #13

Indestructible Hulk #13 misses a sense of importance or weight to the events of the story. With so many cool elements introduced in each issue, it's a shame to see things get wrapped up so quickly and get washed away without fleshing out the characters.

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5.9
Iron Man: The Coming of the Melter 1
5.9
Iron Man: The Coming of the Melter #1

Besides a robotic J.A.R.V.I.S, this issue could have been set in main Marvel 616 continuity, which doesn't really contribute to the Marvel Cinematic Universe as a whole. For new fans seeking any recent Iron Man tale in light of the latest film, I recommend picking up Iron Man #258.1, which is accessible, engaging and doesn't play like a mediocre Marvel Adventures story.

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9.1
Journey Into Mystery 3
8.8
Journey Into Mystery #653

Journey Into Mystery #653 reminds me how much I'll miss the series, and it's unique way of humanizing the Asgardian gods. Immonen puts the characters in situations far from what you'd expect of them, and in doing so, creates novel humour and engaging story.

8.6
Journey Into Mystery #654

While Journey Into Mystery #654 could have devoted a little more attention to the plot, the series remains a joyful read with honest characters.

9.8
Journey Into Mystery #655

Journey Into Mystery #655 is an exceptional superhero comic that inspires with its strong characters and honest messages.After being worked under the talented hands of Immonen and Schiti, Journey Into Mystery will be sorely missed.

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8.4
Judge Dredd: Year One 1
8.4
Judge Dredd: Year One #3

Judge Dredd: Year One #3 is a feat in that it manages to give a gloomy world plenty of character and thrill. Though it doesnt have an obvious emotional core, it delivers on its imaginative world, strong threats and intriguing characters.

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8.9
Justice League 3
8.9
Justice League #20

Apart from guest artist Gene Ha, whose grit doesn't really match the tone of the series (despite it being so damn fine artwork), Justice League #20 offers a strong lead-up to Trinity War, while working as a standalone Justice League outing.

8.7
Justice League #21

Justice League #21 is a fitting conclusion to what Johns has crafted for the Shazam mythos in the pages of Justice League. Establishing a solid supporting cast and tone for the character, Johns leaves the Marvel Family in a great place for any creator who picks up after his work.

9.0
Justice League #22

Justice League #22 takes previously superficial plot points, like the JLA hunting for the JL, and masterfully makes the Trinity War conflict feel legitimate. Johns does so by weaving together various other threads and showcasing characters that show varying degrees of moral judgement, made powerful with Reis' visuals.

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7.4
Justice League of America (2013) 3
7.0
Justice League of America (2013) #4

I want to like this series more, but Justice League of America #4′s effort doesn't quite get me on board with the series' premise or characters. It's Mike Kindt's stellar back-ups that redeem this series month-to-month. If only the depth explored in those 8-page tales could translate into the main feature.

8.2
Justice League of America (2013) #6

Slowing things down, and allowing some room to breathe for repercussions, Justice League of America #6 is an honest look at the rationale of heroes. Their isn't a ton of plot-building, but the time spent learning where the characters stand morally, sets up for some solid, genuine pay off in the future.

6.9
Justice League of America (2013) #7.4

Black Adam's all brawn, not brains in this issue. This isn't necessarily the wrong approach, but the lack of emotional response from the Amon storyline doesn't help to round the story. Justice League of America #7.4 offers a fine set up for Black Adam's rule in Khandaq, but needs future installments to hold itself high.

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7.7
Larfleeze 3
7.9
Larfleeze #1

While the comedy of the issue comes from the retelling of his origin, Larfleeze #1 sets up the character for a truly unique situation and tone in the DC Universe. This series is like nothing else DC has to offer, so instead of pointing this to Green Lantern fans, I say this is for fans who complain DC is too dark at this point in time.

7.9
Larfleeze #2

With nothing anchoring the series plot-wise, a colourful energy and a sharp, humorous script, make Larfleeze #2 a basic, fun read.

7.2
Larfleeze #3

There's fun to be had with Larzleeze #3, and there are definite signs of more of that to come. The relationship between Stargrave and Larfleeze could use some solid development, so that it's worth sticking around for the long haul. Potentially the presence of the ex-slaves will bring that dynamic into full-force.

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5.7
Red Hood And The Outlaws 1
5.7
Red Hood And The Outlaws #23

There's the odd smile with cocky lines of dialogue and big guns, but at the end of the day, this series is in no way a landmark entry in the lives of Arsenal, Red Hood and Starfire.

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7.3
Red Lanterns 3
5.8
Red Lanterns #20

Rankorr, who represents the deadlock the Red lanterns are faced with, shuts down what finally felt like a step forward at the end, when Atrocitus suggests he uses his rage for good. Contrary to Johns and Bedard's heartfelt send offs, Milligan's last issue leaves me wanting more, for all the wrong reasons.

9.1
Red Lanterns #21

Red Lanterns #21 is a wonderful shake up for a series that needed one badly. With engaging characterizations, and perfect use of comedy, Soule and Vitti show us how much fun it can be, to be one of the bad guys.

7.0
Red Lanterns #22

Red Lanterns #22 is an overall enjoyable comic, but definitely hasn't reached a level of intrigue that makes me engaged in the Reds' lives. At this point, I enjoy them getting verbally abused by Guy Gardner more than any of their good fortune.

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8.0
Savage Wolverine 1
8.0
Savage Wolverine #7

Packed with enticing action, mystery and the appropriate dose of laughter (albeit nervous at times) Savage Wolverine # 7 is that “popcorn” comic that doesn't seem to slow down.

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6.9
Secret Avengers (2013) 1
6.9
Secret Avengers (2013) #6

Without focus or time to let the action scenes breathe, Secret Avengers #6 struggles with keeping sustained interest for the duration of the issue.

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5.0
Star Trek 1
5.0
Star Trek #22

Star Trek #22 doesn't dig deeper into the character development of the Star Trek cast. Rather than extrapolating on the characters from the films, it makes similar mistakes in not testing the characters' moral judgement, and just features the most defiant and begrudging Starfleet Officers that presently exist.

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4.0
Star Trek: Khan 1
4.0
Star Trek: Khan #1

With nothing really gripping emotionally, and a totally forced link to the original series, Star Trek: Khan #1 isn't a Star Trek comic worth your time, whether you're a classic Trek fan or a modern one.

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6.6
Supergirl (2011) 1
6.6
Supergirl (2011) #22

Supergirl #22 establishes interesting characters but doesn't dig deeper into their pathos. It instead offers predictable scenarios and cartoonish revelations.

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8.5
Superior Foes of Spider-Man 2
8.7
Superior Foes of Spider-Man #1

The Superior Foes of Spider-Man #1 is more than your typical odd-ball villain outing. Packed with several subplots, and a well-introduced cast of characters, the series shows promise of being a privileged look at the lives of hilariously terrible villains.

8.3
Superior Foes of Spider-Man #2

The Superior Foes of Spider-Man #2′s focus on Boomerang gives an entertaining perspective on bigger-name players in the Marvel Universe and his life as a whole. While more attention could be given to other teammates, Boomerang himself makes for a solid series star.

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6.2
Superior Spider-Man Team-Up 1
6.2
Superior Spider-Man Team-Up #1

Superior Spider-Man Team-Up #1 leaves us with the series premise on the last page, which actually shows some promise. Unfortunately, as a standalone story, this issue did little to develop the impact and toll Otto has on his Avengers pals.

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6.2
Superman (2011) 2
5.5
Superman (2011) #23

The reveal of Psycho Pirate at the end is a good one, and definitely makes me curious for his interaction with Superman next issue. Unfortunately, Superman #23 doesn't give enough of a taste of what that conversation may be like, and uses Psycho Pirate's narration only to assist the basic storytelling.

6.9
Superman (2011) #23.2

Superman #23.2 shows why Brainiac needs to be a concern, but doesn't make us feel sorry for the character, understand his disposition or empathize with his experiences.

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7.9
Superman Unchained 2
8.1
Superman Unchained #1

The last page reveal feels pretty left-field and contrived, but I can see how Snyder is trying to use an even bigger threat to further his humanization of Superman. Superman: Unchained #1 doesnt tackle the over-arching themes that define the character, but it delivered on a solid start for the new series. For new readers seeking a typical Superman action tale, this is for you. For a greater look at how Superman inspires, check out Adventures of Superman #1 that was released last month in print.

7.7
Superman Unchained #2

Superman: Unchained #2 needs more moments like Superman giving General Lane the ultimatum, to really show the character's depth. Otherwise, Superman feels like the less-interesting glue of the book, whose only purpose is to hold together the more interesting supporting cast.

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9.0
Swamp Thing 3
8.0
Swamp Thing #21

While Swamp Thing was before the ultimate destination for fans of the dark side of the DCU, it's now just a pleasant read that doesn't necessarily reach the depths that Snyder took it to. I'm okay with a dark character showing their fun side (hello, Daredevil) but Soule's Swamp Thing feels like a different character. Where did the pain go? Sure, crack a joke, but at least show some of that tortured soul you had in you. Also, the new conflict, "Sanctuarium Folium Viride", feels a little forced, especially when hunters came out of no where to justify the threat.

8.9
Swamp Thing #22

Swamp Thing #21 is an engaging small-scale tale, perfect for longtime readers seeking a more calm and personal Alec Holland story, as well as new readers, who want a taste of the obscurity that Holland faces.

10
Swamp Thing #23

A truly enjoyable and accessible comic, Swamp Thing #23 is the kind of comic that serves audiences who enjoy weirdly endearing stories.

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6.6
Teen Titans (2011) 2
8.6
Teen Titans (2011) #20

This issue is a great example of a backstory done right. It focuses on the past, but doesn't feel like a distraction. Teen Titans #20 is a great read, and made me more interested in Raven than I've ever been prior.Final Score:

4.5
Teen Titans (2011) #22

Teen Titans #22 doesn't successfully live up to the promise of previous issues, and unfortunately leaves Trigon an unthreatening and uninteresting nemesis for the team. Walking away from this issue, it feels like the Titans haven't changed a bit from this encounter.

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8.0
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles New Animated Adventures 1
8.0
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles New Animated Adventures #2

The suitably strange foe brings out the loveable dynamic and fighting-style of the Turtles. The spotlight on the Turtles' camaraderie is heartwarming and the definite draw of the series. Now for April to create her own established role among the cast.

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6.7
The Crow: Curare 1
6.7
The Crow: Curare #1

The Crow: Curare #1 successfully paints an awfully grim picture. Unfortunately, theres no character in the entire issue that I feel any real emotional attachment to. Rather than following the series at the hopes that Det. Salk will make the violence stop, Ill likely stop the violence myself by avoiding the next issue.

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7.9
The Fury of Firestorm: The Nuclear Men 1
7.9
The Fury of Firestorm: The Nuclear Men #19

Everything about this issue takes me back to when I was a kid; the art, the dialogue and the story beats, each aspect a refreshing tale amidst the current slate that DC offers. While I can't say I'll return to this series every month, as my tastes have matured, it's nice to know I can visit this series for a fun, simple, superhero tale.

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7.8
The New Ghostbusters 1
7.8
The New Ghostbusters #5

Ghostbusters #5 churns out another amusing, and surprisingly deep, installment in the lives of the Ghostbusters. While their goofy, anti-establishment spark is crushed a little by their mentorship role, I see the conflict with Peck and Hardemeyer reigniting their loveable edge.

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9.0
The X-Files: Season 10 2
9.0
The X-Files: Season 10 #1

For old fans looking to get their X-Files fix, or comic fans who never delved into the series, The X-Files: Season 10 #1 is an accessible read that manages to rekindle charm and curiosity of the show. Dare I say it, The X-Files: Season 10 is the best licensed book IDW has on the stands.

8.9
The X-Files: Season 10 #2

The X-Files: Season 10 #2 continues to honour the series that has come before it, pairing a smart, focused script, with suitably evocative art.

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8.3
Thumbprint 1
8.3
Thumbprint #1

With plenty of intrigue and action, this issue is a stellar read, and a well-paced comic. The lead character is well defined through narration in the present, and flashbacks. Thumbprint #1 successfully establishes the premise and with suspense, teases the consequences that Mallory Grennan will be dealt with as a result of her actions.

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3.0
Thunderbolts (2012) 1
3.0
Thunderbolts (2012) #8

This book is better left unread, as it does little to nothing to contribute to these characters. But if you do read it, you will find lots of 'buddabudda' onomatopoeia. So there's that.

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4.8
Transformers Prime: Beast Hunters 2
4.8
Transformers Prime: Beast Hunters #2

Transformers Prime: Beast Hunters #2 is an example of a licensed tie-in that fails to truly expand the world of its franchise. Because the featured characters are less known, than say, Optimus Prime, the series could have really benefitted from some more back story for the characters. Failing to deliver on plot, and pure spectacle, fans of Transformers are better left quenching their thirst elsewhere.

4.8
Transformers Prime: Beast Hunters #2

Transformers Prime: Beast Hunters #2 is an example of a licensed tie-in that fails to truly expand the world of its franchise. Failing to deliver on plot, and pure spectacle, fans of Transformers are better left quenching their thirst elsewhere.

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4.4
Transformers: Monstrosity 1
4.4
Transformers: Monstrosity #1

Transformers: Monstrosity #1 is for those who seek to learn every nuance of development that happens on Cybertron. Otherwise, this series is void of progress for these characters and fails in telling a well-paced story.

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7.8
Transformers: Robots In Disguise 2
8.0
Transformers: Robots In Disguise #19

Besides the detractor of the muted colour palette, The Transformers: Robots In Disguise #19 brings equal parts joy and intrigue, as the animated series' that sparked our interest in the franchise managed to do.

7.6
Transformers: Robots In Disguise #20

At times the direction of the issue is unclear, but The Transformers: Robots In Disguise #20 is a full-reveal as to who Starscream is as a leader and a friend.

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7.7
Wolverine MAX 3
8.2
Wolverine MAX #6

This book is better left unread, as it does little to nothing to contribute to these characters. But if you do read it, you will find lots of 'buddabudda' onomatopoeia. So there's that.

7.4
Wolverine MAX #7

Wolverine MAX #8 isn't Hugh Jackman, but it's the kind of true grit and edge that you won't find in any other Wolverine series. While you may not feel the need to go to it monthly, give an arc of this series a shot. And if Robert Rodriguez movies are up your alley, this is a good destination.

7.4
Wolverine MAX #8

Wolverine MAX #8 isn't Hugh Jackman, but it's the kind of true grit and edge that you won't find in any other Wolverine series. While you may not feel the need to go to it monthly, give an arc of this series a shot. And if Robert Rodriguez movies are up your alley, this is a good destination.

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6.9
Worlds' Finest 3
6.8
Worlds' Finest #12

Levitz offers what feels like a teaser for what's to come. While it's an amusing teaser, I can't say it justifies the price of the comic. Within the context of a trade paperback, this instalment may fare better.

6.9
Worlds' Finest #13

There is a lot of so-bad-it's good, goofy moments in Worlds' Finest #13, but with their integrity proven in earlier appearances, both Power Girl and the Huntress deserve something better in the DCU.

6.9
Worlds' Finest #13

There is a lot of so-bad-it's good, goofy moments in Worlds' Finest #13, but with their integrity proven in earlier appearances, both Power Girl and the Huntress deserve something better in the DCU.

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8.2
X-Factor 3
9.4
X-Factor #255

This terrific instalment makes it evermore bitter that Peter David is leaving the title. While sentiment is high, David puts the team through a Hell that is of higher magnitude than anything experienced before. As X-Factor faces their darkest moments, they shine their brightest.

8.3
X-Factor #257

X-Factor #257 doesn't make the series feel like its reaching its end, but rather indicates that there is much more chaos to be endured for the team. I look forward to how future character-focused issues fare, and if this issue is anything like what's to come, horrific consequences can be expected for the team.

7.0
X-Factor #258

Rahne's inevitable fate at the end of the issue is touching, having now committed herself to John Madrox's ministry, but the path to getting there in this issue felt a little too speedy. This story could have really used another issue, or less of the action sequence at the beginning, to give X-Factor #258 the real Wolfsbane closure the character deserved. Otherwise, the character is laid to rest in a logical manner, true to what David has crafted for her over the course of the series.